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Holes: Redux
by Tom Basden

Arcola Tent, London
16 July 9 August 2014

cast list | reviews | photographs | flyer


 
Cast List
 
Ian Daniel Rigby
Gus
Mathew Baynton
Marie
Elizabeth Berrington
Erin
Sharon Singh
 
Produced by Debbie Hicks, Oliver Mackwood & Jesse Romain
Written by Tom Basden
Director –
Phillip Breen
Designer
Rhys Jarman
Lighting Designer
– Joshua Carr
Sound Designer
Andrea J Cox
Costume Supervisor
Verity Sadler
Company Stage Manager
Rachel Gillard
Stage Manager
Izzie Sullivan
Assistant Stage Manager
Olivia Whittaker
Sound Engineer
Wes McCann
Production Electrician
Laurence Russell
Associate Director
Alexander Lass
Production Manager
Meg Jones
General Management
Jamie Hendry Productions
 



To read the Arts Editor of The Independent newspaper David Lister stating that our production was 'downright disrespectful' and that it ought to be 'pulled' please click here.
 
To read Phillip Breen's full response please click here.
 
An interview with Tom Basden in The Guardian is here.
 

 
Reviews

Critics Choice
Time Out
by Stewart Pringle
 
It’s always arresting when a play gets unintentionally caught up in circumstances. Since this story of four survivors of an inexplicable plane crash premiered in Edinburgh last year, one passenger flight has disintegrated and another vanished entirely. Tom Basden’s play reflects only dimly on these events – in occasional threads of techno-scepticism or post-9/11-paranoia – but still, the timing makes the blacks blacker and the laughs considerably less easy in this frequently hysterical comedy.
 
Ian, Gus and Maria are three thirty-somethings who were on their way to a dreadful conference on market demographics before their plane tanked on a desert island. They’re joined by Erin, a quiet and vulnerable teenager. On one level we’re in familiar Lord of the Flies territory, and the final scenes in particular feel disappointingly pat. But it’s the meat Basden makes of the detritus of modern life that ensures Holes is such a chilling hoot. 
 
Basden is particularly accomplished at splitting apart the commonplace to reveal comic absurdity and dangerous untruths. His physical comedy plays the same trick with objects: Coldplay’s Fix You is re-appropriated to score a funeral; an iPad is re-purposed as a spade for burying bodies. As the increasingly confident Ian begins to revel in this clean slate of a new world, everyday ignorance and brutality digs deep around the foundations of civilisation until language, sense and civility catastrophically subside.
 
As Ian, there’s a fantastic performance from Daniel ‘BT Infinity’ Rigby that tips brilliantly from comedy into horror, and Elizabeth Berrington is excellent as the tragically banal Marie. It’s all a lot cleverer than its bantering tone suggests, and a lot funnier than anything that ratchets so gleefully through the lost luggage of our collective dignity has any right to be.
 
 

The Sunday Times
by Olivia Marks
 
”Why would terrorists bring down a random passenger plane?” Mathew Baynton’s character, Gus, asks at the beginning of Tom Basden’s new dark comedy. Too soon? Well, probably. But Basden’s sharply observed play was written long before the Malaysia Airlines tragedy, making it — as well as very funny — horribly, weirdly prophetic. When their plane crashes, three co-workers and a teenager are stranded together on a desert island. What follows is best described as a team-building exercise dreamt up by the devil (or, perhaps, Bear Grylls), with 16-year-old Erin used as if she were their unpaid intern, there to fetch fruit and chicken chasseur from the wreckage. While Gus is blindly committed to the idea of rescue, however bleak, HR manager Marie is having the time of her life sifting through the deceaseds’ luggage for designer clobber. But Coldplay-loving Ian (Daniel Rigby) — who talks as if every sentence were a tweet… literally — thinks this is his opportunity to build a new, more wholesome life for them all. It’s The Beach meets Beckett, but with more laughs.
 
 
British Theatre Guide
by Adam Penny
 
During this wonderfully hot British summer, you may find a stranded foursome on a sand-filled circus drum, appearing to be on a hot island but actually, they’re playing in a suitably tropical Arcola Tent.
 
Considering that, since this play was penned and after its première in Edinburgh last year, one plane has vanished completely and three have fallen out of the sky within the last fortnight, you can appreciate why it’s somewhat topical.
 
Instead of mulling over the unfortunate timing of this run though, you’re much better off to appreciate this play for the fast-paced, witty, touching thing of beauty that it so
effortlessly presents itself as.

 
Ian (Daniel Rigby), Gus (Mathew Baynton) and Marie (Elizabeth Berrington) are thirty-something year-old colleagues, on their way to a conference that none of them want to attend.
 
Marie treats the crash as the holiday she's been dying for, Ian to unleash his caveman-like instincts, and Gus to put each of them down and get drunk. Teenager Erin (Sharon Singh) is the fourth survivor, somewhat underwritten, but crucial nonetheless. 
 
This solid cast delivers this refreshingly brilliant tragicomedy with ease, and where the play succeeds is where it doesn't try too hard. The final scene is frustratingly disappointing and much too disjointed, but the vast majority of this play is some of the funniest contemporary theatre to be found, surprisingly so.
 
It's difficult to find a fault; it's intelligent when you dig deep and an absolute blast on the surface.
 
 

Exeunt
by Tim Bano
 
Teambuilding in extremis.
 
It starts quite full on: “everyone else is dead”. Four people stand in a raised sandpit. They are the only survivors of a plane crash, stranded on a desert island. From this not unfamiliar premise writer Tom Basden walks a tightrope between humour and horror.
 
As the characters talk, Basden’s sharp observational skill picks up on the little things that make air travel unique. “Gus broke his arm because his tray table was down” accuses Ian, “It fell down” Gus claims. They have a finite supply of mini Sprites and a choice of chicken chasseur or mushroom risotto. The fact that the characters focus on these in-flight oddities is part of what makes them all so deeply unpleasant. None of them seems to understand the seriousness of their situation. Mathew Baynton as Gus is closer to grief than Ian and Marie; a faraway look settles over his eyes, he is angrier than the others. He clings to a broken radio, trying to make contact with anyone or anything. He shouts “FUCK!” out towards the vast ocean.
 
For ignorant Ian (Daniel Rigby) everything is a competition, an attempt to prove that he’s the man, the leader. Rigby makes Ian brilliantly annoying, he makes his voice louder than the others, his self-assurance is unwavering. But he’s an idiot. Attempts to record all of his knowledge in the blank grids of a bumper Sudoku book are futile (“Pi is not 3. The earth goes around the sun”). Rigby gives Ian at the same time a density and a depth that make him horrible and also completely understandable. Instinct tells us to sympathise with these characters, that they are in the middle of a deep psychological trauma. But they make it so hard. Still, even Marie (Elizabeth Berrington) – hideous, self-obsessed, decked in the expensive dress she snaffled from a dead woman’s case – hits at something sympathy-inducing: she can’t understand that there’s no one in charge.
 
Basden’s characters are tightly drawn and he extracts as much humour as possible from them. It’s only in the disturbing final quarter that Holes starts to forget that it’s a comedy. Otherwise, the humour comes thick, fast and with varying degrees of edginess – from silly wordplay “Why can’t you get pain killers in the jungle? Parrots ate ‘em all” to jibes at Gus’ dead wife. And then, every so often, Basden pulls the rug with lines that whip the audience back to the reality of the on stage situation – “can you bury my parents separately” asks 16 year old Erin.
 
An uncomfortable tension persists throughout, that if this were all real the behaviour of the characters would be deplorable, unconscionable – but it’s OK, because it’s just a play. Except elements of their situation are real, and recent. Holes was written before the news of flights MH17 and MH370. This prescience makes some of the laughs feel tactless and unnerving: “planes just don’t go missing” says one character.
 
Rhys Jarman’s set, a large, round sandpit, is a miniaturised representation of the characters’ situation. The actors are on a small island which sits in the middle of the audience, while the characters on a small island surrounded by the corrupting sea. The sand, smooth at the beginning, is rough, peaked and tousled by the end as the turmoil of the characters’ relationships climaxes.
 
Holes is like one of those teambuilding exercises in extremis: hierarchies form, natural leaders emerge regardless of any incompetencies they may have, the rest of the team tries hard to suppress just how pissed off they are. Basden is, in a sense, diddling us. He has mastered ‘The Apprentice effect’, the feeling that, when we laugh at Lord Sugar’s contestants, we think we’re better than them. Except we’re not. What if the world ended tomorrow and only four of us were left? What could we do? Despite, or because of, an eye for the absurdities of our lives Basden hits at something profound and disturbing. Civilisation is a process of aggregation, of the slow and collective accumulation of knowledge. I’ve just about mastered Mail Merge, but I can’t build a house. How would we get clean water, stay sanitary, make pens? How would we live? I think we would just shout. And piss. And die.
 
 

The Upcoming
by Donna Mackay
 
Stranded on a desert island, four plane crash survivors – three bored office workers and a nubile teenage girl – contemplate survival in the most comedic manner while addressing some of life’s greater issues: Louboutins, Pythagoras’ Theorem and of course the apocalypse.
 
Holes descends on the Arcola Tent, the most unassuming but spectacularly set up DIY venue in East London, powered by the award-winning combination of writer Tom Basden (Peep Show and Fresh Meat) and director Phillip Breen (The Merry Wives of Windsor). This fanciful desert island adventure takes place in a large sandpit in the Arcola Tent, with audience members encircled in a circus-like aesthetic.
 
Holes kicks off with razor-sharp comedy; it’s laugh-a-minute from the get-go and the audience audibly agree. Elizabeth Berrington revels in her role as micro-managing HR manager, Marie, consistently and dynamically bouncing off main protagonist and star of the show Daniel Rigby. Rigby (recognisable as Simon the Student in the BT adverts) shines in his role as the David Brent-like, self-appointed leader of the island. Deadly serious with echoes of Tim Key’s dead-pan delivery, he is alpha male facing his beta adversary, Mathew Baynton, playing Gus – sarcastic and infuriated to be in this situation with such banal characters. Gus delightfully narrates the constant vapid interactions between Ian and Marie, delivered with eloquent wit and sneering acumen.
 
The second half of the show descends into a dystopian nightmare, though still comedic, ending in teenage pregnancy and murder. Holes begins as The Office and contorts into Lord of The Flies. A previous hit with Edinburgh Festival audiences, Holes looks destined to leave the same mark on London. This hilarious desert island comedy drama adds as fresh spin to this potentially overused setting. At a time when a show about a plane crash could not be less comedic, Holes shines as a witty and intelligent contemporary adventure tale, a black comedy, which, though slightly risqué at times, pleases an audience thirsty for something fresh with its boundless ingenuity.
 
 

Destination Hackney
by Victoria Walvis
 
Three conference organisers and a teenage girl are stranded on a desert island following a plane crash that wipes out their fellow passengers.
 
A glib conversation about the availability of mini-spirits in the wreckage, and the potential use of a plastic bucket and spade from a child’s hand luggage to dig a mass grave for the dead, is cut short by the girl’s entreaty that her dead parents be buried separately from the anonymous dead.
 
Tragicomedy doesn’t quite sum up the tone of Tom Basden’s Holes – instead the play strikes an unsettling balance between the bleak, the mundane and the ludicrous.
 
On a stifling summer’s evening, theArcola Tent is an appropriate arena for a desert island; from the moment undimmed lights blaze down on a round sandpit stage, strewn with upended luggage, Philip Breen’s production cuts its audience no slack – it has them doubled up with laughter, then abruptly silenced by the macabre reality of untimely death.
 
The play would be a little too relentless and incredulous (it’s hard to believe the characters’ almost instant resolve that the rest of the world has been wiped out in an apocalyptic attack) were it not flawlessly cast and almost zealously acted.
 
Daniel Rigby is the single-minded Ian, a cross between Marlon Brando and Tarzan, who doggedly vouches to populate the island with wooden huts that’ll be 'more like chalets' and, subsequently, his (and no one else’s) children. Meanwhile his antithesis, a lanky Gus (Matthew Baynton), gulps down the contents of the minibar and derisively belittles all attempts (mostly Ian's) to survive.
 
The antipathy between the men is matched only by the jealousy of one woman for the other. Marie (Elizabeth Berrington), a frustrated HR manager, natters about holidays and house prices; and admires the designer heels she’s salvaged from the plane.
 
The teenage Erin (Sharon Singh) is the young rival in Marie’s failed conquest of Gus. In a noisy clash of character and opinions, naïve Erin is the sole voice of reason: “It doesn’t matter if you’re right. It matters what you do.” But even Erin is eventually dragged into the adult fray – she too is forced to play her part in a play that can be summarised as Lord of the Flies for grown-ups.
 
The prevailing moments in Holes require its audience to consider whether continuation of the human race is moral or merely instinctive, and Gus’s unexpected recitation of Rupert Brooke’s The Soldier sends shivers down the spine. It’s an exhausting evening, but one well spent.
 
 
Reviewsgate
by Timothy Ramsden
 
Comedy turns serious as island life become characters’ world.
 
In Tom Basden’s play three members of a public-relations team are cast away on a desert island, along with a silent 16-year old. They are sole survivors of a ’plane crash and for the first scene or two, in a play which sustains each scene admirably, there’s a Neville’s Island feel to things.
 
In Tim Firth’s comedy, businessmen on a Lake District island for a bonding experience develop tensions and conflict. But when Basden’s characters attempt radio-contact they find they are part of a far wider disaster, and will have to survive alone.
 
Here the play comes to resemble a malign version of J M Barrie’s The Admirable Crichton. For there will be no return to the previous life and Barrie’s swift switch from a hierarchy based on character not birth is replaced by a more gradual power shift from quick-witted Gus’s dominant irony towards the stolid Ian. What develops is a grouping based on force of personality. And that force becomes increasingly self-deluded with consequences variously harmful and fatal.
 
Basden, and Philip Breen’s clear but never overstated production, pace the transition well. It’s strongly acted, Daniel Rigby showing Ian’s obtuse organisational skills gradually as Matthew Baynton’s Gus loses his early sparkle. Elizabeth Berrington gives Marie the only signs of hope, before Ian’s behaviour suppresses her, while Sharon Singh’s Erin shows as much through expression and manner as through words how the younger woman cannot avoid submission to Ian’s forceful demands.
 
In the Arcola Tent, (close to the main Arcola) with its central raised acting platform, summer conditions were only too apt for the characters’ sweltering experience, while designer Rhys Jarman showed even desert islands take on the character of those who land there. In later scenes the sandy floor is strewn with 21st-century consumer detritus.
 
As books become valuable in Ian’s mind only as practical guides to surviving and Gus descends into drunken weakness the hole these people’s lives and work have dug for themselves become more apparent, right to the final point when everyone is 
isolated and the cry of a baby sounds more futile than hopeful.
 
 

Plays To See 
by Jo Cheroomi
 
Some might say that the 'stranded-on-a-desert-island' idea has become rather hackneyed over the years. Don’t get me wrong, you can of course expect some of the usual Lord of the Flies markers from Tom Basden's Holes, though the difference here is that we’ve been allowed to laugh at this version of the classic castaway plot.
 
The comedy element doesn’t really come from the horrendous events that saw these four characters stranded on the island (that really would be in quite bad taste after the recent Malaysian Airlines tragedy), but rather from characters themselves. The personalities featured are that of three co-workers en route to Australia for a conference and a teenager whose parents died in the crash. What makes them so convincing (not to mention hilarious) is the fact that they are so familiar to most of us. 
 
For example, everyone knows a 'Marie’ (played here by Elizabeth Berrington) a superficial attention seeker who hides her insecurities under a veil of self importance and demonstrates said importance by shamelessly bossing around the younger, prettier though weaker Erin (Sharon Singh). Everyone knows a ‘Gus’ (BAFTA nominated Mathew Baynton) the seemingly ‘normal one’ who spends more time rolling his eyes at the people around him than actually helping. But it was Daniel Rigby who stole the show with a flawless performance and spot on comedic timing as Ian – the overbearing office idiot whose ridiculously grandiose survival ideas continued to extract laughter all the way through to the rather bleak end. And it is a bleak end. 
 
And a bleak middle...and a bleak beginning come to think of it. In fact the whole plot uses comedy to disguise a very dark undercurrent of death and desperation that you would expect from this genre. Some might say that the 'stranded-on-a-desert-island' idea has become rather hackneyed over the years. Don’t get me wrong, you can of course expect some of the usual Lord of the Flies markers from Tom Basden's Holes, though the difference here is that we’ve been allowed to laugh at this version of the classic castaway plot.
 
The Arcola Tent in Dalston is the perfect venue for this simple production. It's not the most comfortable of places to sit still for a couple of hours; it's too hot and the chairs are awful, but the shape of the room means that you can sit anywhere and still have a wonderful view of the giant sand pit stage. And what better circumstances to sit in sweltering humidity than to watch a play set on a remote tropical island? It certainly added to the sense of authenticity. 
 
What you can expect from this production is to come away feeling as though you need to see it again, just to clarify what it is you've just witnessed. Is it a comedy? A tragedy? Or a tragedy under the guise of a comedy? This feeling is really rather fitting, as it seems the whole storyline focuses on the way in which we try to categories things in order to make sense of them. The three co-workers being employed by a demographics agency only adds to the sense that the desert island fantasy has once again been used as a means to explore the different elements of our human nature and indeed the roles we take in extreme situations. Think Lost meets The Office and you'll get the gist. The quality of the acting was what bumped up the plays credibility and really built the connection between the audience and the stage. Definitely worth a watch.
 
 

West End Frame
by Andrew Tomlins
 
A plane crashes in the middle of nowhere and only four passengers survive: three work colleagues and a young girl too afraid to talk. Will they be rescued? Will they be forced to begin a new life? On paper Holes doesn't sound like a comedy, but Phillip Breen's production of Tom Basden's play is surprisingly funny. 
 
This was my first time seeing a show inside the Arcola Tent (a short distance from the Arcola Theatre). Once inside the space feels very much like a circus tent, providing a totally unique theatrical experience. Holes is perfectly suited to this environment, with the cast of four performing on a suitably sandy stage. 
 
Holes is the best contemporary off-West End play I have seen for months. Following recent events Holes is frighteningly relevant, but impressively Basden tastefully finds room for humour. The comedy comes from the four contrasting characters who all bring different energies and styles to proceedings. 
 
Elizabeth Berrington steals the show as HR manager Marie who comes out with some cracking one-liners. Poor Marie never really digests the situation and is far more interested in flirting with Ian. 
 
Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby have strong chemistry as constantly squabbling Gus and Ian. Sharon Singh completes the cast, making a remarkable professional debut as Erin. 
 
The Arcola Tent is the hottest theatre I have visited so far this summer. I have never been part of such a sweaty audience and I have never looked around and seen so many people fanning themselves with programmes. However, as long as you go prepared Holes is certainly worth the extreme heat, I can't imagine it working so well in any other space. 
 
Holes works because, as well as being consistently funny throughout, the writing is both intriguing and gripping. Holes takes some dark turns; some twists don't come as a surprise, but others are eye opening.
 
 

A Younger Theatre
by Ruby-Isla Cera-Marle
 
It’s the end of the world and the only known survivors are three colleagues on their way to a conference and a sixteen-year-old girl. Marooned on an island, we find Marie (Elizabeth Berrington), a busybody head of HR who seems more concerned about rooting through the abandoned suitcases from the plane crash than thinking up a survival strategy; Gus (Mathew Baynton), a straight-talking realist with an unlikely penchant for Lionel Richie; and, juxtaposing Gus brilliantly, daydreamer, idealist and natural comedian Ian (Daniel Rigby). Completing the unlikely quartet is Erin (Sharon Singh) , a young girl who after a prolonged period of stunned silence reveals that she has been recently orphaned as her parents tragically died in the crash. Considering Holes centres around the bleak subject matter of apocalyptic survival, it may surprise you to learn that Tom Basden’s play is in fact an extremely funny black comedy.
 
In the centre of the Arcola’s pop-up summer tent venue, the stage is comprised of a circular sandpit. Basden’s flair for offbeat and slightly twisted humour is apparent from the moment that Rigby’s character, Ian, announces that he is going to dig graves to bury the fatalities using a children’s bucket and spade set. With only the remains of what was left on the plane, the group decide that their only means of survival is to resort to drinking the miniature beverages from the plane’s refreshment trolly. One of my personal comedic highlights is when gossip-filled Marie pilfers some Louboutin heels from one of the abandoned suitcases and insists on strutting around in them, despite repeatedly sinking into the sand beneath her. Alongside the humorous moments, there are also tense and dramatic exchanges as the group and young Erin in particular are faced with a series of morally complex dilemmas.
 
Holes is a fine example of character-driven drama; engaging protagonists portrayed by this impeccably talented cast mean that although very little action occurs, Holes is utterly captivating from start to finish. I think it is largely due to the natural rapport and on-stage chemistry between the small cast of four. Rigby in particular, with his James Corden-esque and charismatic delivery, is a true delight to watch.
 
I found the ending of Holes unexpected, bizarre and, for a play that has otherwise been of staggeringly high calibre, a tad unsatisfying, which I thought was a real shame. That said, for the most part Holes is witty, funny and a sand-filled corker of a play.
 
 
Partially Obstructed View
 
Some productions seem to appear with perfect timing while others have the worst; it's certainly the latter when a black comedy about a plane crash coincides with news of a real one. So there's a certain amount of blocking out unfortunate associations to be done here, but Holesdeserves it. Tom Basden's writing has gone from the witty, silly Party, which also became a Radio 4 sitcom, to darker absurdism including adapting Kafka for the stage. Both styles are apparent in his latest play which had an Edinburgh run last year and now comes, slightly rewritten, to the Arcola's infrequently-used third space, the Tent. I'd not seen anything here before, and it turns out to be a fun space, in the round and feeling a bit like a small circus tent, although the constant noise of traffic, Overground trains and even a gospel choir may explain why it usually houses comedy or music rather than straight plays.
 
Rhys Jarman's set is a raised drum of sand in the middle, the desert island on which we meet the only four survivors of the crash (and maybe, as they come to believe, the sole survivors of a global apocalypse.) Three of them are co-workers on their way to a conference; the fourth is Erin (Sharon Singh,) a teenage girl who's just lost both parents in the disaster.
 
Erin will have a part to play in the story but at first the orphaned girl is ignored by the trio as they treat being stranded as an extension of their long-standing office politics. So the alpha-male Ian (BAFTA-winning broadband salesperson Daniel Rigby) loudly takes charge, while doing little of any use, and missing the desperate flirting coming from Marie (Elizabeth Berrington.) Meanwhile Gus (Mathew Baynton,) with a broken arm and worried he'll never see his kids again, finds solace in the plane's alcohol supplies.
 
Although it goes to a few very dark places, Holes is frequently very funny. There's a lot of witty back-and-forths, and petty arguments given an added absurdity by the situation. Ian's gruff, fruitless action contrasts well with Gus' louche, comic despair. And both men have moments when their hands steal the show – Baynton's left hand should probably have got its own programme credit for its performance in one particular scene, while Rigby's moment of air-piano is one of the best-timed pieces of physical comedy you'll see.
 
The pacing of the final scene dips a bit at times and it could maybe have been more succinct, but Basden has come up with a sometimes bleak but always comically familiar look at people taken out of their comfort zone but unable to leave their old selves behind. And Phillip Breen's production has a good handle on the play's absurdity and some strong performances, Rigby in particular providing tireless comic invention.
 
 
That's Theatre Darling
by Alicia Luba
 
The last time director Phillip Breen and writer Tom Basden put their heads together, the endearingly oddball comedy Party was the result. As their next venture Holes opens at the Arcola, the duo retains the knack for sourcing our best comic actors and giving them a refreshingly idiosyncratic script to rattle through. The result is a riotous satire, full of inappropriate belly-laughs as Flight BA043 has crashed on a desert island, lost to the outside world.
 
The subject is unfortunately timed. It’s impossible to sit through lines like “planes don’t just go missing!” without a small grimace. But neither Basden’s writing, nor the actors carrying it, make any apology for this darkly humorous production mounted on a giant sand pit in the Arcola Tent. Horrible Histories’ Matthew Baynton and BAFTA winner Daniel Rigby star as stranded co-workers Ian and Gus. Along with their Head of HR, Marie, and sixteen-year old Erin, they are the sole survivors. 
 
While the colleagues quibble about Sudoku, use an iPad as a spade and try to salvage several copies of The Gone Girl from the fuselage, it is only Erin (Sharon Singh) who is a credible foil to their idiocy. Without her grounding the play, we’re in danger of being sucked into Basden’s screwball universe. His script brilliantly combines crude, contemporary slang but also develops its own head-scratching phraseology. Like Beckett, Basden is crafting a world that is both disorientating and painfully familiar. 
 
The actors are tireless through the full two and a half hours. Restricted to an appropriately claustrophic set, the range of physical comedy they’ve developed with Breen is impressive. Elizabeth Berrington is wonderfully archetypal as the petty, self-absorbed HR Manager Marie but Holes is carried by Rigby and Baynton. The pair manage to wring every irony from dim-witted, but increasingly hubristic, Ian and his cynical counterpart, Gus.
 
As the headlines become increasingly grave, Holes offers an unusual treat. If you feel ready to laugh about plane crashes, terrorism or World War Three, there isn’t a smarter production around. And Basden is one of our most accessible satirists, 
astute but never alienating.
 

 
  


Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton and Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton and Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh, Mathew Baynton and Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh, Mathew Baynton, Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh, Elizabeth Berrington, Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh, Elizabeth Berrington, Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton.Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh, Mathew Baynton, Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton, Elizabeth Berrington, Sharon Singh and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Elizabeth Berrington. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynon, Elizabeth Berrington, Daniel Rigby and Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton, Sharon Singh and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Sharon Singh. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Mathew Baynton and Daniel Rigby. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 

Daniel Rigby and Mathew Baynton. Photo © Idil Sukan / Draw HQ 
 
   
  

 
 


   
Flyer. Photo: Konrad Mielniczuk
 

 
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